A Crowd-Sourced Knowledge Management Approach to Language Preservation and Revitalization: the Case of Te Reo Māori

Many linguists claim as many as half of the world’s nearly 7,105 languages spoken today could disappear by the end of this century. When a language becomes extinct, communities lose their cultural identity and practices tied to a language and intellectual wealth. Preservation of endangered languages is critical, but a […]

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A Mobile Game World for Māori Language Learning

This project involves the research, development and evaluation of a mobile assisted language learning tool that teaches some aspects of the Maori language within a virtual game world. The Maori language has been going through a process of rejuvenation since the mid-1900s. A wide range of multimedia resources have been […]

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The Challenges and Opportunities of Using Mobile Devices to Attain Māori Language Proficiency

What are the effects of using mobile devices as part of teacher professional development focused on teaching and learning the Māori language for Māori immersion educational settings? Answers to this question are explored by researching the extent to which electronic devices could be an effective strategy to address the crisis […]

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Māori Dictionary Project

As well as the words one would expect in a traditional dictionary, Te Aka has encyclopaedic entries including the names of plants and animals (especially native and endemic species), stars, planets and heavenly bodies, important Māori people, key ancestors of traditional narratives, tribal groups and ancestral canoes. Māori names for […]

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Special Issue of the Journal of Material Culture: Digital Subjects, Cultural Objects

The Journal of Material Culture is concerned with the relationship between artefacts and social relations irrespective of time and place and aims to systematically explore the linkage between the construction of social identities and the production and use of culture. Special Edition edited by Amiria Salmond and Billie Lythberg Introduction […]

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Digital Subjects, Cultural Objects

Special Issue of the Journal of Material Culture The Journal of Material Culture is concerned with the relationship between artefacts and social relations irrespective of time and place and aims to systematically explore the linkage between the construction of social identities and the production and use of culture. Digital Subjects, […]

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Indigenous Language Usage in a Digital Library: He Hautoa Kia Ora Tonu Ai

Abstract The research described in this thesis examines indigenous language usage in a digital library environment that has been accessed via the Internet. By examining discretionary use of the Māori Niupepa and Hawaiian Nūpepa digital libraries this research investigates how indigenous languages were used in these electronic environments in 2005. […]

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Transforming Communities: Technologies for Teaching and Learning Endangered Languages

Introduction Māori are the indigenous people of Aotearoa/New Zealand. Māori is one of three official languages of the country, but is not compulsory in schools. Only 4% of Aotearoa/NewZealand’s total population of around 4 million can speak Māori and only 23% of Māori are fluent in the language (Te Puni […]

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Technology, Education and Indigenous Peoples: the case of Maori

Introduction Technology was introduced, as a formal ‘subject’, into New Zealand’s compulsory education curriculum in 1993, as part of the ‘stunning’ changes which commenced at all levels in 1988. The government’s latest paper ‘Bright future: five steps ahead’ (New Zealand Government, 1999) suggests that we are about to enter, without […]

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Māori Maps: Gateway to Māori world of Marae

“Māori Maps is a gateway to the Māori world of marae. It aims to take visitors to the gateway of marae around Aotearoa/New Zealand; beyond that point, visitors can make their own interactions with the marae community. Māori Maps assembles information about all the traditional, tribal marae. It does not include […]

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