Intellectual Property Watch: Traditional and Indigenous Knowledge

Mission Intellectual Property Watch, a non-profit independent news service, reports on the interests and behind-the-scenes dynamics that influence the design and implementation of international intellectual property policies. Reporting Services Intellectual Property Watch’s reporting is available in online format: Online (ISSN 1661-7355): news stories and features are regularly posted in a […]

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World Intellectual Property Organization: Traditional Knowledge

The term “traditional knowledge” is used here as shorthand for the entire field of traditional knowledge, genetic resources and traditional cultural expressions. Negotiations are currently underway in the WIPO Intergovernmental Committee on Intellectual Property and Genetic Resources, Traditional Knowledge and Folklore towards the development of an international legal instrument or […]

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Traditional Knowledge Bulletin

The Traditional Knowledge (TK) Bulletin aims to provide information for indigenous communities and other relevant stakeholders on TK related discussions at international fora. The TK Bulletin is offered by the UNU-IAS as a pilot activity of the Traditional Knowledge Institute (TKI), which focuses on research and training in many aspects […]

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Knowledge Traditions of Aboriginal Australians: Questions & Answers arising in a Databasing Project

In answering some questions about the place and role of databasing in Aboriginal Australian Knowledge Traditions, the paper gives some interesting insights into the nature and workings of Aboriginal Knowledge Traditions. I consider knowledge traditions of Aboriginal Australians comparatively, by referring to a particular contemporary way of ‘doing knowledge’. The […]

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Aboriginal Knowledge Traditions in Digital Environments

According to Manovich, the database and the narrative are natural enemies, each competing for the same territory of human culture. Aboriginal knowledge traditions depend upon narrative through storytelling and other shared performances. The database objectifies and commodifies distillations of such performances and absorbs them into data structures according to a […]

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Boundaries and accountabilities in computer-assisted ethnobotany

Designing software alongside ethnobotanists, and Indigenous owners and practitioners of traditional knowledge brings to light a range of issues which expose some of the assumptions underlying both western ethnobotany, and software design. Collaborating over the development of software to facilitate the use of digital objects in knowledge work, issues of […]

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Digital Technologies and Aboriginal Knowledge Practices

Indigenous Australians are often keen to use digital technologies in their local knowledge practices as part of a struggle to develop sustainable livelihoods on-country. They want to use digital technologies to ensure that ‘history stays in-place’, seeing their knowledge practices as expressing the remaking of an Ancestral reality. This paper […]

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Other side of the divide: Latin-American and Caribbean Perspectives on the WSIS

Introduction The process generated around the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) is an opportunity to present to the world the contributions that from Latin America and the Caribbean have been made in this respect. Diverse actors of this region of the planet have worked and work today in […]

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IT System to Support Indigenous Knowledge Preservation

Originally published on the School of Information Technology blog (Polytechnic of Namibia) by Linus Kamati on 20 September, 2011. Local and traditional knowledge is shared orally within rural communities; such as through telling of stories. It is not recorded in text or electronically, it is accessible only through participation within the […]

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Geoweb: Indigenous Mapping of Intergenerational Knowledge

Abstract This thesis examines the transmission of intergenerational cultural knowledge on eastern James Bay Cree lands. Geospatial technologies and the representation of Cree knowledge are explored, with emphasis on the geoweb. A geoweb with two parts, old and new, is theorized as compatible with Cree interests at a landscape level […]

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