Free & Open Source Digital Curation, Asset Management & Community Archiving Systems

Updates 12/30/11: Added Archon, Kete, and Open Exhibits. 5/12/12: Added DAITSS, DPSP, HOPPLA, and RODA. 6/8/12: Added Vannotea & Indigenous Knowledge Management Software. 5/13/13: Added ELAN. 7/5/15: Added ArchivesSpace, CollectionSpace, Islandora. In honor of the new year, I thought I’d offer a list of (now 29) free and open source […]

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The Asháninka and the Internet

The other day, I found an IDRC report about the Asháninka and their use of the Internet dating back to 2000. Coincidentally, the Atlantic just ran a post about the Asháninka based on some photos and text released by Survival International. I have cobbled various bits together below with the […]

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Indigenous People on the Web

Abstract This paper explores the ways in which Indigenous people around the world are participating in the World Wide Web, through establishing their own websites or accessing services via the Web. Indigenous websites are remarkably diverse: in addition to those representing Indigenous organizations and promoting Indigenous e-commerce, many websites have […]

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Miromaa Aboriginal Language & Technology Centre

What is Miromaa? From the Miromaa website: Miromaa is a program which we [Arwarbukarl Cultural Resource Association, Inc. (ACRA)] have developed to aid in language preservation, reclamation and dissemination work, it is a easy to use, user friendly database to help you gather, organise, analyse and produce outcomes for your […]

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Recovering and Celebrating Inuit Knowledge through Design: The Making of a Virtual Storytelling Space

Dr. Scott Heyes (Assistant Professor at the University of Canberra) presented this paper at the Indigenous Knowledge and Technology Conference (IKTC 2011) in Namibia on 2-4 November. Dr. Heyes is a Cultural Geographer and Landscape Architect who has worked on some very interesting projects. Abstract Inuit storytelling in the Ungava […]

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The Power of Mobile Technology for the Exchange of Indigenous Knowledge

The Number in My Pocket: The Power of Mobile Technology for the Exchange of Indigenous Knowledge Betsie Greyling (with Ulwazi) and Niall McNulty presented a poster by this name at the The Third International m-libraries Conference (11-13 May 2011) in Brisbane, Australia. The poster outlines the Ulwazi Programme’s plans for […]

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Digitizing Indigenous Culture: the Maasai of Laikipya

This collection of press releases, articles, and presentation slides tells the ongoing story of the Maasai of Laikipya and their use of technology to preserve and sustain their cultural heritage starting in 2006 to now. Pilot Project with the Maasai Community WIPO Press Release Geneva, May 20, 2008 PR/2008/553 The […]

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Human-Computer Interaction for Development: The Past, Present, and Future

Abstract Recent years have seen a burgeoning interest in research into the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the context of developing regions, particularly into how such ICTs might be appropriately designed to meet the unique user and infrastructural requirements that we encounter in these cross-cultural environments. This […]

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Ara Irititja: Stories from a Long Time Ago

Welcome to Ara Irititja From the Ara Irititja website: “Ara Irititja means ‘stories from a long time ago’ in the language of Anangu (Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara people) of Central Australia. The aim of Ara Irititja is to bring back home materials of cultural and historical significance to Anangu. These include […]

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Digital Songlines project

A kind fellow by the name of Jeremy just sent me a message letting me know that the link to the Digital Songlines page no longer works. After looking around a bit online, I have learned why: the group that created the project is sadly no longer in existence. The […]

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Transforming Communities: Technologies for Teaching and Learning Endangered Languages

Introduction Māori are the indigenous people of Aotearoa/New Zealand. Māori is one of three official languages of the country, but is not compulsory in schools. Only 4% of Aotearoa/NewZealand’s total population of around 4 million can speak Māori and only 23% of Māori are fluent in the language (Te Puni […]

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IT System to Support Indigenous Knowledge Preservation

Originally published on the School of Information Technology blog (Polytechnic of Namibia) by Linus Kamati on 20 September, 2011. Local and traditional knowledge is shared orally within rural communities; such as through telling of stories. It is not recorded in text or electronically, it is accessible only through participation within the […]

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Workshop: Learning from Marginalized Users: Reciprocity in HCI4D

This workshop is one of 15 that will be part of the 2012 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work. CSCW 2012 will be the fifteenth CSCW conference and will be held February 11-15, 2012, in Bellevue, just nine miles from Seattle, Washington, USA. These workshops are collaborative working sessions, […]

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Mukurtu Demo released & other good news…

This is a follow-up post to “Mukurtu gearing up for Spring 2011 release” dated February 27, 2011. Update #1: Mukurtu 0.5 Demo release is now available. Update #2: Mukurtu receives $484,772 National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museums and Library Services. The funding will make it possible to deploy, […]

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Of local interest: The 2011 Saratoga Native American Festival

I rarely if ever wax personal on this blog, but I would like to share news about an upcoming local festival here in Upstate New York called the Saratoga Native American Festival. It has nothing to do with usual Ethnos Project fare like technology and culture or ICT4D – I […]

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Aligning needs and means: On culture, ICT and knowledge in development cooperation

Abstract This paper takes an interdisciplinary view on the societal role of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). The applied research case discussed in building a global online community of practice for people working on community-based natural resource management (CBNRM). The purpose is to point to some limitations connected with culture […]

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Geoweb: Indigenous Mapping of Intergenerational Knowledge

Abstract This thesis examines the transmission of intergenerational cultural knowledge on eastern James Bay Cree lands. Geospatial technologies and the representation of Cree knowledge are explored, with emphasis on the geoweb. A geoweb with two parts, old and new, is theorized as compatible with Cree interests at a landscape level […]

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A New Visualization Approach to Re-Contextualize Indigenous Knowledge in Rural Africa

Abstract Current views of sustainable development recognize the importance of accepting the Indigenous Knowledge (IK) of rural people. However, there is an increasing technological gap between Elder IK holders and the younger generation and a persistent incompatibility between IK and the values, logics and literacies embedded, and supported by ICT. […]

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African Languages in a Digital Age: Challenges and Opportunities for Indigenous Language Computing

About the Book Offering practical approaches to finding a place for African languages in the information revolution, this overview lays the foundation for more effectively bridging the “digital divide” by finding new solutions to old problems. Conducted by the PanAfrican Localization project under the sponsorship of Canada’s International Development Research […]

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Indigenous technology design and its challenges

Christopher Hoadley, Educational Communications and Technology program at New York University … speaking at The Berkman Center Luncheon Series, a weekly series of informal luncheons and other meetings, providing students, fellows, faculty, and anyone who reserves a seat opportunities to discuss issues relevant to their work and to engage other […]

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The use of ICT for the preservation of Aboriginal culture: the Badimaya people of Western Australia

Abstract Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has been applied successfully to numerous remote Indigenous communities around the world. The greatest gains have been made when requirements have been first defined by Indigenous members of the community then pattern matched to an ICT solution. Keywords: Information and Communication Technology, Indigenous Communities, […]

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Preserving Endangered Languages using a Layered Web-based Archive

Abstract Many human languages, an essential part of culture, are in danger of extinction. UNESCO estimates that at least a half of the world’s 6500 spoken languages will disappear within the next 100 years. This problem can be addressed to some extent by computer systems that collect, archive and disseminate […]

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Indigenous education: Creating classrooms of tomorrow today

At the recent 2011 Research Conference “Indigenous Education: Pathways to success” hosted by the Australian Council for Educational Research, Professor Lester-Irabinna Rigney (Dean of Aboriginal Education, Director of the Wilto Yerlo Centre at Adelaide University) presented a talk on “Indigenous education: Creating classrooms of tomorrow today.” Here are some salient […]

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Technology, Education and Indigenous Peoples: the case of Maori

Introduction Technology was introduced, as a formal ‘subject’, into New Zealand’s compulsory education curriculum in 1993, as part of the ‘stunning’ changes which commenced at all levels in 1988. The government’s latest paper ‘Bright future: five steps ahead’ (New Zealand Government, 1999) suggests that we are about to enter, without […]

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Home Internet for Remote Indigenous Communities

Executive Summary Research to date shows that many remote Indigenous communities have little access to the internet and make little use of it. The Indigenous population living in remote and very remote parts of Australia comprises 108,143 people, or 0.54% of the total Australian population (ABS 2006a). In central Australia, […]

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